• A DAY OF HONOURS – Le Prix Gilbert-Buote

    Today, Lieutenant Governor Antoinette Perry opened Government House for a public event for the first time since the plague began. The Comité historique Soeur-Antoinette-DesRoches had been invited to hold it annual prize-giving event in the House and the programme began with introductions of distinguished guests and reminiscences by various individuals of three previous Acadian Islanders who had filled the post of Lieutenant Governor in this very building. Her Honour also explained the symbolism of the beautiful coat of arms presented to her upon her accession. Photo by Trevor Gillingwater The Comité historique Soeur-Antoinette-Desroches had decided to give me a most desirable award, the Prix Gilbert-Buote, for the work I had…

  • Island Maps: The Years after Meacham to World War II – Part 2 – Aerial Photos and Topographic Maps

    In one of my earlier posts, I described how interest in seeing things from on high had its origins in ancient times and, with the invention of photography and the advent of the aeroplane took on an extremely important role in providing new data for mapping purposes and the study and analysis of the configuration of the land for agriculture, forestry, and mining, but also for extremely accurate recording of the progress of World War I. https://regporter.com/pei/2020/04/09/the-origins-of-interest-in-aerial-views/ It was when I flew, for the first time ever, from my new home in Montreal to the Island, that I became intensely interested in the view from the air and what it…

  • Island Maps: The Years after Meacham to World War II – Part 1

    For the time being, the following are my last two posts about maps that concern Prince Edward Island. It is the almost-end of a project that began innocently on June 30, 2020, and which was meant to be a light survey of the most significant Island maps, and which fate somehow turned into a much more comprehensive research project as I became increasingly fascinated with the components of this chronological series. The unwritten subtitle of my Heritage Blog is a personal view. As my study of Island maps moves into the middle of the Twentieth Century my memories leap back to scenes and events that I have illustrated with contemporary…

  • Meacham’s ATLAS Part 4/4 – Art, Architecture and Landscape

    https://www.islandimagined.ca/meachams_atlas The Prince Edward Island atlas is embellished with 163 lithographed views of various Island buildings, farmsteads, commercial establishments, churches, and broad rural landscape. Among those topographical categories are works of art, at a minuscule scale, that display extraordinary skill in presenting very ordinary rural scenes with compositional genius. The Artists At present, we know virtually nothing about the artists Meacham employed in his various projects. Looking closely at the 163 views in the atlas it is easy to see different hands in the composition of the pictures, some just adequate and others very skilled. Throughout the writing of these posts on Meacham’s atlas I only came across the name…

  • Meacham’s ATLAS Part 3/4 – The Maps

    The first great atlas Atlases have been a vital tool of the civilised world since the Sixteenth Century when in 1570 Abraham Ortelius, a Flemish cartographer and geographer published a huge book of woodcut maps called Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, or Theater of the World. Courtesy of Barry Lawrence Ruderman Antique Maps Inc.   It was at a time when in Europe the word theatre had an extraordinarily wide and varied meaning from the anatomical theatres in places like Padua where the human body was explored in detail for the first time (below left), and published, with great engravings (Met New York) that looked like maps (below right), by the Dutchman…